cfcadmin

National Church Residences Expands Portfolio in Atlanta Area with Purchase of Three Senior Housing Communities on the Christian City Campus

UNION CITY, Georgia ­– National Church Residences has finalized the purchase of three affordable senior housing communities located on the 500-acre campus of Christian City in south metro Atlanta, which includes Larry Moore Manor, John Sparks Manor and Gene Miller Manor. The acquisitions add 271 affordable senior housing units to the National Church Residences real estate portfolio in Georgia, expanding into a new part of the Atlanta metro area.

 

The connection between Christian City and National Church Residences is a natural one, based on common commitments to housing and supportive programs and a Christian vision of service to all, regardless of their faith.

 

“The transition that we will have will be a seamless transition,” said Christian City CEO, Keith Horton, during an August 30, 2021, sign unveiling in recognition of the Christian City and National Church Residences partnership. “We are excited about partnering with National Church Residences on our campus to provide services, programming and renovations to the affordable apartments located here.”

In addition to active senior independent housing, the Christian City campus includes a variety of youth residential programs. A partnership with PruittHealth also provides assisted living, skilled nursing, memory care and a rehabilitation center on the campus.

 

“I’m excited about the future,” added Union City Mayor Vince Williams. “It takes teamwork to make the dream work and now better and greater is on the way, thanks to National Church Residences.”

 

National Church Residences also has assumed property management for Larry Moore Manor, John Sparks Manor and Gene Miller Manor as part of the purchases and will continue offering service coordination to all residents. The organization will renovate the communities to update building infrastructure. Apartments will be refreshed with new lighting; new kitchen appliances, updated cabinets and countertops; and updated bathrooms. All common areas and amenity spaces have updates included in the plans. Renovations will begin in late 2021.

 

“Our National Church Residences team is proud to partner with Christian City in this acquisition,” said Director of Senior Housing Acquisitions, Daniel Patrick. “We anticipate acquiring a fourth community on the campus, Garden Terrace, in the near future and look forward to a long and successful collaboration.”

 

“We are thrilled to have the opportunity to expand our mission and our service to seniors in this region,” said National Church Residences’ Senior Project Leader, Maureen Freehill. “It has been a pleasure to work with Christian City and Union City leadership throughout this process.  Our partnership is going to ensure the full preservation of these affordable senior housing communities for decades to come.”

ABOUT NATIONAL CHURCH RESIDENCES
National Church Residences serves more than 42,000 seniors through its array of housing and health care services. The not-for-profit organization is driven by a vision of advancing better living for all seniors, enabling them to remain home for life. With 340 communities in 25 states, it is the nation’s largest not-for-profit provider of affordable senior housing and the largest manager of service coordinators. The organization also offers residential senior communities, home and community-based services, as well as permanent supportive housing for the formerly homeless and disabled. For more information, visit NationalChurchResidences.org and follow us on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

 

ABOUT CHRISTIAN CITY

Christian City was established 56 years ago when the first cottage for neglected and abandoned children opened on Valentine’s Day 1965. Today, there are more than 1,000 residents, both children and senior adults, living at Christian City in south metro Atlanta. In addition to four Children & Family Programs (Children’s Village Residential Program, Crossroads Foster Care & Adoption Program, Safe Place Runaway & Homeless Youth Program, and Thrive Graduate Transition Program), the campus includes 500 retirement homes and apartments for active seniors, a 200-bed skilled nursing and rehabilitation center, a 150-bed assisted living center, and two memory care units. For more information or to learn how you can help this non-profit organization, call 770-703-2636 or visit ChristianCity.org.

 

Read more

Christian City Trustee Appears On Ellen Degeneres Show

November 10, 2021 – Christian City Trustee Emeritus, Normer Adams, was featured on the Ellen Degeneres Show on 11/10/2021. Ellen took a special interest in Normer’s hobby of rescuing cats stuck in trees. Click the video to see the 6-minute clip from the show. Normer passed the blessing along to Christian City when received a check to donate to a charity of his choice.

Read more

Dan Cathy, 100 Black Men of Atlanta and The Home Depot Honored at the Community Champion Awards

ATLANTA (September 30, 2021) – The Community Champion Awards presented by Christian City was held on Tuesday, September 28, 2021, at the Georgia Aquarium. Under the leadership of co-chairs Ron Canakaris and Miguel Southwell and their stellar Host Committee, Christian City honored individuals and organizations that have demonstrated outstanding leadership and commitment toward the betterment of the greater Atlanta community.

The Community Champion Awards dinner paid tribute to three special and deserving recipients in three categories: Dan Cathy in the Individual category, 100 Black Men of Atlanta in the Nonprofit category and The Home Depot in the Corporate category. Renowned broadcast journalist Monica Pearson served as emcee. The Community Champion Awards honorees were also given the opportunity to give surprise recognition to one of their guests at the event who are doing outstanding work in the community. Attendees heard from each of the awards recipients throughout the program. Ambassador Andrew Young, former mayor of Atlanta, was also a guest speaker at this year’s event and was introduced by his close friend, Billye Aaron. Stephanie Blank, 2019 Honoree, was on hand to introduce Dan Cathy and present his award. “After such a trying year, it was incredible to be able to gather once again and recognize the amazing impact these honorees have made in our community and to all those around them,” said Christian City CEO, Keith Horton. “We are grateful for the opportunity to shed light on these individuals and organizations whose work has not gone unnoticed. We can’t thank the 2021 honorees enough and look forward to the future where leaders such as these three continue to make a difference in the lives of many.” Proceeds from the 2021 Community Champion Awards focused on Christian City’s Children & Family Programs, including the Children’s Village family style homes, Crossroads Foster & Adoption program, SafePlace program for runaway and homeless youth, and Thrive Transitional Living Program. After expenses, the event generated $365,000 to support these programs. The 2022 Community Champion Awards will be held on May 5th at the Georgia Aquarium.

About Christian City: Christian City was established 56 years ago when the first cottage for abused and abandoned children opened on Valentine’s Day, 1965. Today, there are more than 1,000 residents, both children, and senior adults, living at Christian City in south metro Atlanta. In addition to four Children & Family Programs (Children’s Village Residential Program, Crossroads Foster Care & Adoption Program, Safe Place Runaway & Homeless Youth Program, and Thrive Graduate Transition Program), the campus includes 500 retirement homes and apartments for active seniors, a 200-bed skilled nursing and rehabilitation center, a 150-bed assisted living center, and two memory care units. For more information or to learn how you can help, call 770-703-2636 or visit christiancity.org.

Read more

Christian City Announces Guest Speaker for 2021 Community Champion Awards

ATLANTA, Ga – (July 12, 2021) – Christian City has announced the guest speaker for the 2021 Community Champion Awards. Ambassador Andrew Young will serve as the guest speaker at the September 28 event honoring an extraordinary group of philanthropic leaders who have dramatically improved the lives of individuals in metro Atlanta and beyond. The Community Champion Awards will pay tribute to Dan Cathy in the Individual category, The Home Depot in the Corporate category, and 100 Black Men of Atlanta in the Nonprofit category.

“We are thrilled and blessed to have Ambassador Andrew Young as our guest speaker this year,” said Christian City CEO Keith Horton. “Our honorees and guests will have the privilege of hearing directly from one of the most distinguished leaders of our time.” Before serving as a politician and diplomat, Ambassador Young began his career as a pastor and was an early leader in the civil rights movement and a close confidant to Martin Luther King Jr. He served as a U.S. Congressman from Georgia, United States Ambassador to the United Nations in the Carter Administration, and 55th Mayor of Atlanta.

Ambassador Andrew Young will serve as the guest speaker at the 2021 Community Champion Awards honoring an extraordinary group of philanthropic leaders who have dramatically improved the lives of individuals in metro Atlanta and beyond – Dan Cathy in the Individual category, The Home Depot in the Corporate category, and 100 Black Men of Atlanta in the Nonprofit category.

The Community Champion Awards was established by Christian City in 2019 to honor individuals and businesses that have demonstrated outstanding leadership and commitment towards the betterment of our metro Atlanta community. Christian City will recognize each of the 2021 honorees at the gala scheduled for Thursday, September 28, 2021. Guests will spend a fun evening at the Georgia Aquarium enjoying great entertainment, delicious food, and the camaraderie of friends. Renowned broadcast journalist, Monica Pearson, will serve as emcee.

Proceeds from the Community Champion Awards will support Christian City Children and Family Programs, which include: Children’s Village Residential Program, Crossroads Foster Care and Adoption Program, Safe Place Runaway and Homeless Youth Program and Thrive Graduate Transition Program.

“The event provides an opportunity to be inspired by those who have made it their purpose to improve the lives of others in the community,” said host committee co-chair, Miguel Southwell. “We look forward to honoring them for the positive impact they are making in metro Atlanta,” said co-chair, Ron Canakaris.

For more information on ticket and sponsorship opportunities, click here.

About Christian City

Christian City was established 56 years ago when the first cottage for abused and abandoned children opened on Valentine’s Day 1965. Today, there are more than 1,000 residents, both children and senior adults, living at Christian City in south metro Atlanta. In addition to four Children & Family Programs (Children’s Village Residential Program, Crossroads Foster Care & Adoption Program, Safe Place Runaway & Homeless Youth Program, and Thrive Graduate Transition Program), the campus includes 500 retirement homes and apartments for active seniors, a 200-bed skilled nursing and rehabilitation center, a 150-bed assisted living center and two memory care units. For more information or to learn how you can help, call 770-703-2636 or visit christiancity.org.

Read more

Race for Safe Place Raises $24,797 for Children & Family Programs

UNION CITY, Ga – June 17, 2021 – The second annual Race for Safe Place on Saturday, June 12, raised $24,797 and involved 84 participants of all ages. The 5K and 1-mile fun run/walk event was held on the 500-acre Christian City campus in south Fulton County.

“With the 2020 Race for Safe Place canceled due to COVID-19, we were very excited for this year’s race to happen in person,” said Mary Elizabeth Kirkpatrick, founder of the Christian City Teen Board, host of the annual Race for Safe Place.

PHOTO ABOVE (by Larry Regier): The overall female and male winners were Jessica Ridley and Jason Veclotch

Proceeds benefit Christian City Children & Family Programs, including the Safe Place Runaway & Homeless Youth Program, which provides trusted help and a place of safety for runaway and homeless youth who are on the streets and in danger of human trafficking. “We are grateful to the sponsors and participants who came out to support the important work that impacts many lives,” said LaVann Landrum, Christian City Chief Advancement Officer.

The overall female and male winners, Jessica Ridley and Jason Veclotch, each received a pair of running shoes, compliments of Dragonfly Running Company in Newnan, Ga. Every runner received a race t-shirt, and prizes were awarded to top runners in each age division. Top sponsors at the “Triumphant” level included: The Coleman Family, Misty Meadows Foundation, Kelly Rodts, RDJE, Inc. – Ronny Jones, and an Anonymous sponsor.

PHOTO ABOVE (by Larry Regier): Three generations of the Adams family participated in the 5K and all were top finishers in their age groups. Pictured from left are Norm Adams, Rowe Adams, Badge Adams, and Normer Adams, Christian City Trustee Emeritus.

Children’s Village house parent, Josh Ellig, led a warm-up for participants prior to the race. Safe Place Coordinators, Tam, and Kelvin Finlay thanked runners, walkers, and sponsors for supporting the mission. “We take calls from youth in all types of crisis situations – locked out, kicked out, and domestic violence, for example. We bring them to the Safe Place home at Christian City and help get them back to some type of normalcy and permanency,” said Tam Finlay.

Eight senior residents, three Trustees, several staff members, and Christian City’s President and CEO, Keith Horton, participated in the race. “We are thrilled to host this event on Christian City’s beautiful campus, where our mission each day is to help children and seniors thrive,” Horton said to the crowd before the race. “Thank you to the Teen Board, sponsors, participants, volunteers, staff, and all who made this event a great success,” he said.

PHOTO ABOVE (by Larry Regier): Crossing the finish line are runners, Kyle Waters (left) and Steven Marcet.

Visit https://christiancity.org/2021-race-for-safe-place-june12/ to see photos from the race. For a list of all event sponsors, visit https://christiancity.org/raceforsafeplace/.

About Safe Place Runaway & Homeless Youth Program

PHOTO ABOVE (by Larry Regier): Safe Place Coordinators, Tam Finlay (left) and Kelvin Finlay, provided information about the Safe Place Program at Christian City. Their daughter, Airris Finlay (center), is a member of the Christian City Teen Board.

Christian City is the local agency for the National Safe Place program, with staff available 24/7. Working in partnership with QuikTrip gas stations, metro Atlanta YMCAs, some fire and police stations in Fulton, Douglas, Carroll, Fayette, Coweta, DeKalb, and Cobb counties, youth in crisis can call or text for help and a member of the Christian City staff will respond immediately to bring youth to safety while finding a long-term solution for their care. Proceeds from the Race for Safe Place benefit the Children & Family Programs, with a focus on raising awareness for the Safe Place Runaway and Homeless Youth Program.

About Christian City

Christian City was established 56 years ago when the first cottage for abused and abandoned children opened on Valentine’s Day 1965. Today, there are more than 1,000 residents, both children and senior adults, living at Christian City, a nonprofit organization that depends on the generosity of donors for financial support. With a $10.2 million annual budget, the 500-acre campus, located 15 minutes south of Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport and adjacent to the Fayette County border, includes the Children’s Village Residential Program, Crossroads Foster Care & Adoption Program, Safe Place Runaway & Homeless Youth Program, Thrive Graduate Transition Program, active senior living patio homes and apartments, thrift store, assisted living center, skilled nursing & rehab center, memory care, home health and hospice care. Christian City Children & Family Programs help provide children in crisis a safe home in a loving family environment to grow and thrive. The nonprofit serves the entire metro Atlanta area and beyond. For more information, visit www.christiancity.org or call 770-703-AMEN (2636).

PHOTO ABOVE (by Larry Regier): Christian City resident, Lindsey Carpenter (center), received her race medal from Lissa Rand, Associate Director of Development, and Keith Horton, President and CEO.

PHOTO ABOVE (by Larry Regier): Christian City Teen Board members, (from left) Mary Elizabeth Kirkpatrick, Isabella Moffett, Hannah Claire Brown, Jaq Kellett, and Banks Coggin, managed the check-in table and cheered for runners at the finish line.

 

PHOTO ABOVE (by Larry Regier): Christian City Children’s Village house parent, Josh Ellig (at left), is pictured after the race with medal winners, (from left) Clarence Watkins, Ashlynn Ellig, Cornell Travick, Joshua Fowler-Patrick.

Read more

Stacey Paden

RESIDENT OF HOME FOR CHILDREN IN THE ‘80s

I remember it like it was yesterday.

I was nervous — but I was also excited.

It was a Wednesday.

I remember crawling in the back seat of the gold van with brown vinyl seats to go to church that night. I remember Mom Ross turning and asking me a question. I was stunned in that moment because I had seen that exact same event unfold weeks before in a dream.

I knew I was safe.

At church that night we had fellowship dinner. I remember I was allowed to eat at the table with the other girls in the home. I a cucumber, tomato, and onion salad with Italian Dressing. I also ate strawberry shortcake for dessert.

It was so good. I went back for seconds without being shamed or told I shouldn’t eat something.

I was SAFE.

I can’t remember how old I was when I arrived at Christian City. In my mind I was an eleven-year-old little girl, but that doesn’t add up correctly with my school years. My counselor explained that PTSD will do that to people . . . time doesn’t add up and some things are forgotten.

Read More

Several months before my arrival at the children’s home I had experienced severe trauma.

Prior to going to live with my dad and stepmom, while living with my biological mother, I began sneaking out, drinking, and smoking with older boys. Things went downhill quickly in one relationship. I said, “Stop. I don’t want to do this.” He said, “I’m almost done.”

I left to live with my dad and stepmom shortly after that. It was then I began to see their true colors. I learned it wasn’t my mom’s fault my parents had divorced. I learned my dad was an unfaithful abuser with an alcohol problem. My stepmother took all the anger and resentment she felt towards my dad out on me. My stepmother told me I was fat. She wouldn’t let me eat. During my time with them I was never given lunch money at school. Cabinet doors were locked so I couldn’t eat. When I was allowed to eat, I had to eat in my bedroom, away from the family. Unless, of course, there was company. Then I always had a place at the table.

On my birthday I was asked what I wanted for dinner that night. I responded, “Pizza.” As I took my first bite I was told to go to my room to eat.

I cried that night.

I started begging for food at school, stealing from the convenience store, and eating out of my own outside trash can.

And then I got caught.

I was beaten every morning and every night by my dad and/or stepmom. They used my dad’s leather belt with his heavy brass Marine Corps belt buckle.

I could barely walk from the pain of the beatings and sitting down in the chairs at school took my breath away.

I didn’t dress out for PE for weeks. One day we had running evaluations for a timed grade. Coach Hess yelled at me, “go dress out!” I could barely take off my blue jeans more less bend over to put on those cute gray running shorts and tennis shoes.

How was I going to run?

I can still see the moments unfolding . . .

I could hear the door clang shut behind me as I walked out the gym door towards the field. I could hear all the kids talking and playing as I approached them.

Then I heard the eeriness of silence as I walked passed each group.

Seconds later Coach Hass walked up behind me, put her arm around my shoulders, and said, “It’s going to be okay.”

And I sobbed.

Before we even got in the locker room the curly, red haired dean was in there waiting on me.

Someone drove me home that night. And as we turned into Clovewood Place I saw the street lined with police cars. As I walked in the house, my dad jumped up out of the chair and started coming at me screaming, “This is all your fault!” The police officers shifted in front of him, and I was escorted to my room. It was then I was asked to take off my clothes, pull my underwear down to my ankles, and hold my ankles so the police could take pictures of the extensive bruising. Shortly after I went to live in the Christian City Children’s home and I stayed there until I graduated from high school.

During my time there I was allowed to be a kid. I was allowed to swing on the swing sets, shoot hoops, play sports in high school, get a job, go on dates and to proms. I was allowed to form friendships for the first time in my life. Dad Ross even taught me to drive! I was also able to make stupid mistakes. I even ran away – once.

I made severely poor choices after I left the children’s home and lost contact for many years with the Ross’s, but I have always treasured them for not getting rid me when I was at my worst.

During my time in the children’s home, we attended church EVERY Sunday morning, Sunday night, and Wednesday night. I believe — even though I wanted nothing to do with God — it was those practices that drew me in to the church after ten years of alcohol abuse that led to my homelessness. During those hard years I drank excessively, got high frequently, and was never faithful to anyone. I hurt many people by lying, cheating, stealing, and being unfaithful in relationships.

I knew I needed help on the morning of July 7, 1998, when I woke up in a rage and beat my then  six-year old daughter.

I had become my dad.

I attended my first Most Excellent Way meeting that night. And just over ninety days later, on October 19, 1998, I surrendered my life to Lord, asking Him to forgive me, to save me, and to help me break the cycle of addiction and abuse. He’s been holding my hand, guiding me every step of the way these twenty-three years and now uses my stories of abuse and addiction to help other women.

When I left the children’s home I was torn. Part of me wanted to stay with the Ross’s, but there was no place for me to go. After graduation or turning eighteen, I had to leave.

That was hard.

I loved the Ross’. I never felt like I wasn’t one of their own. I always felt like I was family. I will never forget them, or their children, for the sacrifices they made in life, to give a wounded, broken girl the chance to have a normal childhood.

Today

My family lives in the panhandle of Florida. I have a 16-year-old son and 15-year-old daughter at home. My oldest daughter, who lived through some rough days with her momma, lives in Virginia with her husband and my two precious grandbabies.

Today, I am active in my church where I lead a ladies Sunday School Class, volunteer with the Charis House ministry (a home for women coming out of addiction), and I am part of the ministry team for the Most Excellent Way, sharing my story of hope to those hurting through addiction.  My life goal is to let others know they are not alone, and as long as there is breath . . . there is hope.

My favorite pastime is capturing moments in time through a lens. I currently volunteer with AHERO (America’s Heroes Enjoying Recreation Outdoors – serving Veterans with PTSD to reduce the suicide rates among Veterans), photographing and documenting events for their quarterly magazine. I am also working on a book sharing my life story, as well as compiling images of my photographs for publication.

Website: StaceyPaden.com

Photographs: StaceyPaden.smugmug.com

Read more

National Safe Place Week Celebrates Safe Place® Program for Youth

UNION CITY, Ga – March 18, 2021 – National Safe Place Network (NSPN) is pleased to announce March 21-27, 2021 as National Safe Place (NSP) Week. The nationally recognized week serves to raise awareness about the Safe Place program, a national program which brings together youth service agencies, businesses, volunteers, and other community partners to help youth in crisis.

“Unfortunately, young people face troubling issues in today’s world, such as abuse, neglect, bullying and serious family problems,” said Laurie Jackson, President and CEO of NSPN. “It’s up to all of us to offer solutions, places where youth can go to get help. National Safe Place Week is the perfect opportunity for communities across the country to assess and strengthen their safety net for youth.”

Safe Place consists of a national network of more than 22,000 partnering businesses and community locations, such as fast-food restaurants, convenience stores, fire stations, public buses, and libraries, which display the Safe Place sign in their windows. As youth enter a designated Safe Place and ask for help, trained staff members connect them to the appropriate youth shelter for assistance.

Local Safe Place Coordinators, Tam and Kelvin Finlay, respond 24/7 to youth in crisis who reach out through the Safe Place Program. The Finlays also work with community partners and school social workers to increase awareness of the Safe Place Program among metro Atlanta middle and high school students in Fulton, Douglas, Carroll, Fayette, Coweta, DeKalb and Cobb Counties. Youth in crisis can text “safe” to 4HELP (44357) or call 770-964-3301. For more information about the Safe Place Runaway & Homeless Youth Program at Christian City, visit christiancity.org/safeplace.

In addition to Safe Place sites, youth may also access immediate help via TXT 4 HELP, a text-for-support service for youth in crisis. Teens can text the word “safe” and their current location (address, city, state) to 4HELP (44357) to receive a message with the closest Safe Place location and the number for the local youth shelter. Users also have the option to text interactively with a counselor for more help.

Safe Place, operated locally by Christian City, partners with businesses and community organizations to provide immediate safety and support for local youth in a large part of metro Atlanta, including Fulton, Douglas, Carroll, Fayette, Coweta, DeKalb and Cobb Counties. Local Safe Place site locations include QuikTrip stores, YMCA of Metro Atlanta locations, and some fire stations. Other Safe Place agencies serve the remainder of metro Atlanta.

Program Executive, Sarah Booth, has been a member of the Christian City Children & Family Programs staff since 2014 when Christian City became a local licensed Safe Place agency. “Before coming into foster care, I was an at-risk youth. The Safe Place Program would have really aided me in getting the help I needed,” said Booth. “Our Safe Place coordinators respond 24/7 to youth in crisis with a goal to help youth get to safety before they are harmed on the streets.”

Since its inception in 1983, Safe Place has helped more than 359,000 youth and currently serves more than 1,500 communities across the country. The program is managed by 140 youth agencies in 38 states and the District of Columbia.

During National Safe Place Week, the coordinators of Safe Place Runaway & Homeless Youth Program at Christian City, Tam and Kelvin Finlay, are visiting schools to increase awareness of Safe Place among school social workers and educators. Teachers may access a free informational Q&A video to show in their classrooms or virtually to inform students in middle and high schools about the Safe Place Program. The video link and other resources for educators are located at www.christiancity.org/SPresources.

About Safe Place Runaway & Homeless Youth Program at Christian City

Christian City is a licensed Safe Place agency for runaway and homeless youth across a large part of metro Atlanta. We serve Fulton, Douglas, Carroll, Fayette, Coweta, DeKalb, and Cobb Counties through a partnership with QuikTrip stores, YMCA of Metro Atlanta locations, and some fire stations. In addition to entering those Safe Place locations displaying the yellow and black Safe Place sign, teens can also text the word “safe” and their current address to 4HELP (44357) or call 770-964-3301 for immediate assistance. Our staff responds 24/7 to help youth ages 12 to 17 who are in crisis. Youth on the streets who have run away from home or have been forced from their home are in danger of being lured into sex trafficking and other harmful activities. The Safe Place Program exists to quickly get the youth to safety, assess their crisis situation, and get the help they need. For more information, visit www.christiancity.org/safeplace.

About Christian City

Christian City was established 56 years ago when the first cottage for abused and abandoned children opened on Valentine’s Day, 1965. Today, there are more than 1,000 residents, both children and older adults, living at Christian City, a nonprofit organization that depends on the generosity of donors for financial support. The 500-acre campus in South Fulton County includes the Children’s Village Residential Program, Safe Place Runaway & Homeless Youth Program, Crossroads Foster Care & Adoption Program, and Thrive Graduate Transition Program, as well as active senior housing. Through a partnership with PruittHealth, the Christian City campus also includes a skilled nursing center, assisted living center, memory care, home health and hospice care. For more information, visit www.christiancity.org or call 770-964-3301.

About National Safe Place Network

National Safe Place Network (NSPN) provides quality training, capacity building, and technical support to youth and family service organizations across the nation. NSPN operates nationally recognized programs, including Safe Place®. More than 20,000 businesses and community locations participate as Safe Place sites – such as restaurants, convenience stores, fire stations, public buses, and libraries. These locations display the Safe Place sign and connect youth in crisis with resources and supports. Safe Place also provides a national text-for-support program, TXT 4 HELP. Teens can text the word “SAFE” to 4HELP (44357) and access options to locate the nearest Safe Place and text one-on-one with a counselor. TXT 4 HELP is available 24/7/365. Learn more about NSPN and Safe Place at www.nspnetwork.org and www.nationalsafeplace.org.

Read more

Two Sparrows Village Announces Partnership with Christian City, Inc.

UNION CITY, Ga. – January 7, 2021 – Two Sparrows Village has announced a partnership with Christian City, Inc. to create an inclusive neuro-diverse housing option for adults with intellectual disabilities and autism. A Christian City cottage originally built in 1981 for the children’s residential program will be renovated and repurposed to create four independent-living apartments for Two Sparrows Village residents to live on the 500-acre campus in south metro Atlanta. Scheduled to begin in 2021, the partnership will also include an adult day service program for adults with intellectual disabilities and autism. Opportunities for recreational programming, volunteer activities and employment will be provided by Christian City. The John and Polly Sparks Foundation has provided funding for the cottage renovation.

Jacque Thornton, Executive Director of Two Sparrows Village, remarked, “We are excited to partner with Christian City to lead and address this important housing option for our neighbors and the I/DD community. Communities like Two Sparrows Village foster natural interactions with neurotypical neighbors, roommates, co-workers, and volunteers.”

Keith Horton, President & CEO of Christian City, said, “The individuals served by Two Sparrows Village are differently abled, but they deserve quality affordable housing with supportive services and workforce opportunities. In line with our mission to extend Christ’s call to love our neighbor, Christian City is pleased to have the opportunity to expand housing and provide services for this vulnerable population through a partnership with Two Sparrows Village.”

A dedication ceremony is planned for 10am on Saturday, January 9, 2021 at Christian City, located at 7345 Red Oak Road in Union City, Ga. Benefactors and the Two Sparrows Village board of directors and leadership team will gather to celebrate this groundbreaking development south of I-20 in Metro Atlanta. Development partners, Terry Chapman, Kim Mills-Smith with KS Home Solutions, and Delta Air Lines are managing the cottage renovation. George Martin, Christian City COO, will speak to the attendees, as well as Two Sparrows Village Founder, Jennifer Conforti, and Two Sparrows Village President, Janet Preston.

About Two Sparrows Village

We believe all adults should have opportunities for an independent life consistent with their individual capabilities. Those with intellectual disabilities thrive in environments that include life-long learning, meaningful friendships, and opportunities to contribute to their communities. As special-needs children grow older and age out of the education system, living arrangements for those with intellectual disabilities are limited. Two Sparrows Village provides a supportive living environment for adults with intellectual disabilities within an inclusive community that promotes greater independence and an exceptional quality of life for adults with lifelong challenges. For more information, visit www.twosparrowsvillage.org or call 404-538-2285.

About Christian City

Christian City was established 55 years ago when the first cottage for abused and abandoned children opened on Valentine’s Day 1965. Today, there are more than 1,000 residents, both children and senior adults, living at Christian City, a nonprofit organization that depends on the generosity of donors for financial support. With a $10.2 million annual budget, the 500-acre campus, located 15 minutes south of Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport and adjacent to the Fayette County border, includes the Children’s Village Residential Program, Crossroads Foster Care & Adoption Program, Safe Place Runaway & Homeless Youth Program, Thrive Graduate Transition Program, active senior living patio homes and apartments, thrift store, assisted living center, skilled nursing & rehab center, memory care, home health and hospice care. Christian City Children & Family Programs help provide children in crisis a safe home in a loving family environment to grow and thrive. The nonprofit serves the entire metro Atlanta area and beyond from its campus in south Fulton County. For more information, visit www.christiancity.org or call 770-964-3301.

Read more

Christian City, Inc. Announces New Board of Trustees

UNION CITY, Ga. – December 22, 2020 – Christian City, Inc. has announced the election of eight new trustees. The following individuals joined the nonprofit organization’s board of trustees during 2020:

Dale Cardwell – TrustDale; Christopher Gilliam – VP Operations, Headley Construction; Phil Hamilton – Retired Executive Director, AMRO Bank; Russ Heil – Retired, Delta Air Lines; Michael Johnston – Partner, Nicholas, Cauley & Associates; Ginger Pope – Wealth Advisor, Truist; David Sexton – CFO/Controller, Operation Mobilization/Tyrone; and Jacquelyn Thornton – Executive Director, Two Sparrows Village.

The board elected the following officers to serve for fiscal year 2021: Chairman – Paul Chancey, CPA, Cherry Bekaert LLP; Vice Chairman – Mike Harbin, Community Volunteer; Secretary – Lawton Roberts, Owner, Uniglobe Country Place Travel, Inc.; and Treasurer – Terry Head, Strategic Systems Support Analyst, Georgia Power Company.

Keith Horton, President & CEO, said, “We appreciate the leadership and commitment of our board of trustees, especially as Christian City embarks on ambitious plans to expand the programs and services offered on our campus. The founders and early leaders of Christian City answered the call to serve the most vulnerable in our society, children and senior adults. Today, we continue the mission to love our neighbor and offer hope by caring for the least of these. Our bold vision demands a bold board of trustees, and I am excited about working with these wise and generous leaders.”

About Christian City

Christian City was established 55 years ago when the first cottage for abused and abandoned children opened on Valentine’s Day 1965. Today, there are more than 1,000 residents, both children and senior adults, living at Christian City, a nonprofit organization that depends on the generosity of donors for financial support. With a $10.2 million annual budget, the 500-acre campus, located 15 minutes south of Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport and adjacent to the Fayette County border, includes the Children’s Village Residential Program, Crossroads Foster Care & Adoption Program, Safe Place Runaway & Homeless Youth Program, Thrive Graduate Transition Program, active senior living patio homes and apartments, thrift store, assisted living center, skilled nursing & rehab center, memory care, home health and hospice care. Christian City Children & Family Programs help provide children in crisis a safe home in a loving family environment to grow and thrive. The nonprofit serves the entire metro Atlanta area and beyond from its campus in south Fulton County. For more information, visit www.christiancity.org or call 770-964-3301.

Read more

NewLife Radio Donates Gift Cards for Christian City Children & Family Programs

UNION CITY, Ga. – December 17, 2020 – After visiting Christian City’s Children’s Village a few years ago, NewLife Radio Vice President and General Manager, Michael Shelley, felt like he and his wife needed to be more involved. He thought NewLife Radio and their listeners could play a huge part, too. That was the beginning of “A Christian City Christmas” fundraising campaign started in 2019.

This year, with the pandemic, Shelley and the staff of NewLife Radio didn’t know if they could do the campaign for Christmas 2020. However, a few NewLife Radio donors asked and that got the ball rolling for Christmas gifts for the Children’s Village and Crossroads Foster & Adoption programs again this year. Shelley said, “We are instructed in scripture to take care of widows and orphans and this is just one way we can share the hope of Christmas.”

Shelley and Doug Doran, President of NewLife Radio, delivered gift cards for the children living at Christian City Children’s Village and foster children in Christian City Crossroads Foster Care & Adoption Program. House parents and foster parents were blessed with gift cards as well.

“Due to a crisis they are experiencing, these children will be spending Christmas away from their family or the people they love the most. Our youth come from hard places,” said Marlond Fyffe, Executive Director of Christian City Children & Family Programs. “Without any fanfare, our caregivers are devoted and resilient. They do a remarkable job ministering to the children’s physical, emotional, and spiritual needs.”

In accepting the donation, Fyffe expressed his gratitude for NewLife Radio’s partnership and act of generosity. “The outpouring of love during this time of the year from our friends at New Life Radio certainly reinforces and reminds the children we serve and their caregivers that they matter to God, our partners, and to our community. We are so very grateful to the New Life Radio family for remembering our children and their caregivers,” Fyffe said.

About Christian City

Christian City was established 55 years ago when the first cottage for abused and abandoned children opened on Valentine’s Day 1965. Today, there are more than 1,000 residents, both children and senior adults, living at Christian City, a nonprofit organization that depends on the generosity of donors for financial support. The 500-acre campus, located 15 minutes south of Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport and adjacent to the Fayette County border, includes the Children’s Village Residential Program, Crossroads Foster Care & Adoption Program, Safe Place Runaway & Homeless Youth Program, Thrive Graduate Transition Program, active senior living patio homes and apartments, thrift store, assisted living center, skilled nursing & rehab center, memory care, home health and hospice care. Christian City Children & Family Programs help provide children in crisis a safe home in a loving family environment to grow and thrive. The nonprofit serves the entire metro Atlanta area and beyond from its campus in south Fulton County. For more information, visit www.christiancity.org or call 770-964-3301.

 

NewLife Radio representatives, Michael Shelley, VP and General Manager, and Doug Doran, President, delivered gift cards for the children living at Christian City Children’s Village and foster children in Christian City Crossroads Foster Care & Adoption Program. House parents and foster parents were blessed with gift card donations as well. Pictured at the Children’s Village are (from left), Mike Shelley, Keith Horton, Christian City President & CEO; Sarah Booth, Program Executive; Doug Doran, and Marlond Fyffe, Executive Director of Christian City Children & Family Programs.

Read more